MassFX

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MassFX is an unified physics simulation framework, introduced by Autodesk in 3ds Max 2012 (and 3ds Max Design). While being based on PhysX SDK, MassFX has replaced old Havok Reactor physics engine. Unlike Reactor, MassFX is performing simulation directly in viewports.

MassFX Toolbar in 3ds Max 2012
MassFX Toolbar in 3ds Max 2013

MassFX is comprised of several simulation modules - first one, mRigids rigid body dynamics, was released as part of 3ds Max 2012, second - mCloth cloth simulation was presented in 3ds Max 2013. More advanced modules are in development.


Contents

Mass FX Modules

mRigids

mRigids is a module, responcible for simulation of rigid bodies. It supports static, kinematic and dynamic rigid bodies (box, sphere, capsule, convex and composite concave physical mesh types), various constraints (rigid, twist, slide, hinge, universal and ball & socket), dynamic and kinematic ragdolls. Results of the simulation can be baked in keyframes for subsequent rendering.

Rigid body objects can be influenced by standart 3ds Max Forces, like Vortex, PBomb or Wind (MassFX 2013 feature).

mRigids module is using PhysX SDK 2.8.4. and does not support hardware acceleration.

mCloth

mCloth is a module capable of cloth simulation. It provides full collisions with mRigids bodies with 2-way interaction, supports per-vertex tearing, internal pressure, vertex group operations (like pin or attach to object) with support for keyframe animation, kinematic cloth, baking to keyframes.

Cloth objects can be influenced by standart 3ds Max Forces, like Vortex, PBomb or Wind (MassFX 2013 feature).

mCloth module is using PhysX SDK 2.8.4.

mParticles

3ds Max 2014 includes new MassFX module - mParticles, which is, basically, a modified version of Orbaz Particle Flow Box #2 plug-in.

mParticles is an all-purpose simulation solution, that can be used to calculate behavior of various types of objects: particles, deformables (glued particles), cloth, fluids and smoke.

Module is using PhysX SDK 2.8.x

Other notes

See also

External links


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