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Archive for the ‘Simulation’ tag

PhysX Research: Position Based Fluids explained

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Position Based Fluids – this fluid simulation technology has indeed got some attention lately, and now, new “Position Based Fluids” paper by Miles Macklin (NVIDIA) and Matthias Müller-Fischer (NVIDIA) can give one a proper insight on the algorithm.

Abstract:

In fluid simulation, enforcing incompressibility is crucial for realism; it is also computationally expensive. Recent work has improved efficiency, but still requires time-steps that are impractical for real-time applications.

In this work we present an iterative density solver integrated into the Position Based Dynamics framework (PBD). By formulating and solving a set of positional constraints that enforce constant density, our method allows similar incompressibility and convergence to modern smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) solvers, but inherits the stability of the geometric, position based dynamics method, allowing large time steps suitable for real-time applications.

We incorporate an artificial pressure term that improves particle distribution, creates surface tension, and lowers the neighborhood requirements of traditional SPH. Finally, we address the issue of energy loss by applying vorticity confinement as a velocity post process.

Written by Zogrim

April 24th, 2013 at 11:07 am

Introduction to Position Based Fluids

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Many of you may have already seen an impressive real-time destruction and fluid simulation demo from GDC 2013.

Update: Position Based Fluids explained

Update #2: Introducing NVIDIA FLEX: unified GPU PhysX solver

We won’t talk about fracturing technology today, instead, let’s focus on the new fluid simulation algorithm, presented in the demo – it is known as Position Based Fluids.

Position Based Fluids is a way of simulating liquids using Position Based Dynamics (PBD), the same framework that is utilized for cloth and deformables simulation in PhysX SDK.

Because PBD uses an iterative solver, it can maintain incompressibility more efficiently than traditional SPH fluid solvers. It also has an artificial pressure term which improves particle distribution and creates nice surface tension-like effects (note the filaments in the splashes). Finally, vorticity confinement is used to allow the user to inject energy back to the fluid.

More details on this a new technique will be available later on, in a SIGGRAPH 2013 paper “Position-Based Fluids” by Miles Macklin and Matthias Mueller-Fischer, and we also expect it to be included in future versions of PhysX SDK or APEX modules.

Written by Zogrim

April 22nd, 2013 at 11:17 am

PhysX Research: Position-based Methods for the Simulation of Solid Objects

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Position-based Methods for the Simulation of Solid Objects in Computer Graphics” – recent paper by Matthias Müller-Fischer, PhysX SDK Research Lead in NVIDIA, and others.

Paper provides in-depth overview of special class of simulation methods, namely position-based approaches, for solid objects, such as rigid bodies, cloth and softbodies.

The dynamic simulation of solids has a long history in computer graphics. The classical methods in this field are based on the use of forces or impulses to simulate joints between rigid bodies as well as the stretching, shearing and bending stiffness of deformable objects. In the last years the class of position-based methods has become popular in the graphics community. These kinds of methods are fast, unconditionally stable and controllable which make them well-suited for the use in interactive environments.

Position-based methods are not as accurate as force based methods in general but they provide visual plausibility. Therefore, the main application areas of these approaches are virtual reality, computer games and special effects in movies.

This state of the art report covers the large variety of position-based methods that were developed in the field of deformable solids. We will introduce the concept of position-based dynamics, present dynamic simulation based on shape matching and discuss data-driven approaches. Furthermore, we will present several applications for these methods.

Some of the described techniques were used in PhysX SDK (as well as other physics engines) for a long time, some have been implemented only recently, other are yet ander active research.

Written by Zogrim

February 26th, 2013 at 7:51 pm

PhysX Research: Fast Simulation of Inextensible Hair and Fur

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New “Fast Simulation of Inextensible Hair and Fur” paper from Dr. Matthias Müller-Fischer and PhysX Research team is a further extension of the work on realtime fur and hair simulation, previously demonstrated at GDC 2012.

Update: Introducing NVIDIA HairWorks – fur and hair simulation solution, based on the research

In this short paper we focus on the fast simulation of hair and fur on animated characters. While it is common in films to simulate single hair strands on virtual humans and on furry animals, those features are either not present on characters in computer games or modeled with simplified textured meshes. The main difficulty of simulating hair in real time applications is the sheer number of hair strands and the fact that each hair is inextensible. Keeping thousands of deformable objects from being stretched is computationally expensive.

In this paper, we present a robust method for simulating hair and fur that guarantees inextensiblity with a single iteration per frame. For an iteration count this low, existing methods either become unstable or introduce a substantial amount of stretching. Our method is geometric in nature and able to simulate thousands of inextensible hair strands in real time.

Like with any other research projects, there is a high probability that this particular technology will be utilized in future releases of PhysX SDK or APEX.

Written by Zogrim

December 21st, 2012 at 11:10 am

ARMA 3 will use PhysX engine

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Recently opened website of ARMA 3, new game in a series of battlefield simulators from Bohemia Interactive, has revealed that PhysX SDK has been chosen as physics simulation solution for this title.

Physical simulation & improved animations

Take advantage of PhysX™ supporting the vehicle simulation, in-game interactions and the revamped animation system.

However, it is yet unknow if PhysX (likely SDK 3) was implemented to handle CPU oriented physics only (which is good in any case – previous games even haven’t ragdolls or rigid bodies) or ARMA 3 will feature support for GPU accelerated physics as well.

ARMA 3 is scheduled for release exclusively for PC in Summer 2012

Written by Zogrim

May 19th, 2011 at 7:56 pm

Posted in PhysX Games

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