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Archive for the ‘FLEX’ tag

NVIDIA FLEX SDK 1.1 is available for download

with one comment

NVIDIA has revealed latest version of the unified simulation solver – FLEX.

Update: official announcement from NVIDIA

Major feature of this release is the introduction of DX11/DX12 support, in addition to default CUDA implementation, so FLEX solver will run across all compatible graphics cards including AMD and Intel ones.

NVIDIA FLEX SDK 1.1.0: Release Notes

  • New API style, for consistency with other products the API has now an NvFlex prefix and follows a naming convention similar to PhysX
  • Add support for DirectX, in addition to CUDA there is now a cross-platform DirectX 11 and 12 version of the Flex libraries that Windows applications can link against
  • Add support for max acceleration clamping, see NvFlexParams::maxAcceleration, can be useful to reduce popping with fast moving kinematic shapes and large interpenetration
  • Add support to querying compute device, see NvFlexGetDeviceName()
  • Add support for flushing compute queue, see NvFlexFlush()
  • Add support for multiple library instances, NvFlexInit() now returns a library which is bound to a single compute device
  • Add support for local space particle simulation, see NvFlexExtMovingFrameInit() and two new local space fluid and cloth demos
  • Add support for CUDA 8.0.44
  • Read the rest of this entry »

    Written by Zogrim

    March 1st, 2017 at 8:28 pm

    Posted in GameWorks

    Tagged with ,

    GDC 2017: NVIDIA Gameworks goes DX12 and more !

    with 3 comments

    Quite an interesting beginning of GDC 2017NVIDIA has not only presented their newest flagship GPU, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, but also announced several additions to the GameWorks libraries.

    Let’s take a closer look.

    FleX & Flow

    NVIDIA FleX, unified particle-based solver, and NVIDIA Flow, an engine for simulation of smoke and fire, now both feature hardware agnostic DX12 implementation !

    This is exciting news not only for gamers, but also for 3d party companies, already utilizing FleX in their products, such as Lucid Physics from Ephere.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Written by Zogrim

    March 1st, 2017 at 10:04 am

    NVIDIA FLEX SDK 1.0 released

    without comments

    NVIDIA has just released a new version of the FLEX universal particle solver.

    nvidia-physx

    NVIDIA FLEX SDK 1.0.0: Release Notes

  • Added support for reporting collision shape ids, and trigger volume shapes, see flexGetContacts()
  • Optimizations to host code performance
  • Fix for potential memory leak in SDF object destruction
  • Fix for potentially missed collisions during convex shape CCD
  • Fix for incorrect bounds computation during flexSetShapes() (if not specified by user)
  • Fix for initial shape translations being incorrect when using a transform with flexExtCreateInstance()
  • Move flexExt.h header to the /include folder
  • FLEX SDK 1.0 can be downloaded at GameWorks Download Center (registration guide).

    Written by Zogrim

    March 18th, 2016 at 11:24 am

    Posted in GameWorks, PhysX Middleware, PhysX Tools

    Tagged with

    Fallout 4 beta patch adds Nvidia FLEX based particle debris effects

    without comments

    Recent 1.3 Beta update (availabe through Steam on PC) for Fallout 4, among various bug fixes, adds several new graphics features – HBAO+ ambient occlusion and, suprisingly, physically simulated debris effects from bullet impacts, exclusive to NVIDIA GPUs.

    (You can also find some comparison videos on YouTube – Link 1, Link 2)

    More intersting, said effects are completely based on the new NVIDIA FLEX solver, and are not using any portions of PhysX SDK, like many other GPU PhysX games.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Written by Zogrim

    January 16th, 2016 at 6:32 pm

    Posted in GameWorks, PhysX Games

    Tagged with , , ,

    Preliminary PhysX FleX integration into Unreal Engine 4 is available

    with 34 comments

    NVIDIA FleX is the new GPU accelerated particle-based simulation library. The core idea of FleX is that every object is represented as a system of particles connected by constraints. Such unified representation allows efficient modeling of many different materials and natural interaction between elements of different types, for example, two-way coupling between rigid bodies and fluids.

    Update: FLEX SDK 0.8 can now be downloaded through GameWorks Download Center

    Interested developers may be pleased to hear that NVIDIA has already completed basic integration of FleX solver into Unreal Engine 4, and it can be freely obtained with one specific UE4 source code branch at GitHub.

    Standalone FleX SDK and sample demo executable (as showcased below) are also included in the package.

    To get access to the UE4 source code branch with FleX integration few steps are required:

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Written by Zogrim

    March 14th, 2015 at 5:46 pm

    Posted in Engines and Wrappers, PhysX SDK

    Tagged with ,

    Introducing NVIDIA FLEX: unified GPU PhysX solver

    with 8 comments

    About a month ago, NVIDIA has revealed a new unified GPU accelerated physics framework – NVIDIA FLEX – at “The Way It’s Meant To Be Played” press event in Montreal.

    Today, Miles Macklin, physics programmer at NVIDIA and lead-developer of the FLEX system, has joined us to share first-hand details about this exciting technology.

    PhysXInfo.com: So what is the NVIDIA FLEX exactly ? What are the main features of FLEX ?

    Miles Macklin: FLEX is a multi-physics solver for visual effects.

    It grew out of the work I did on Position Based Fluids, which was later extended to support two-way coupling between liquids and different object types such as clothing and rigid bodies.

    The feature set is largely inspired by tools like Maya’s nCloth and Softimage’s Lagoa. The goal is to bring the capabilities of these off-line applications to real-time games.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Written by Zogrim

    November 12th, 2013 at 11:08 pm

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