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Archive for the ‘Alice’ tag

Getting GPU PhysX effects into games: interview with NVIDIA Content Team

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Certainly, many of you will agree that the addition of GPU PhysX effects to PC games has a positive influence on overall gaming experience and immersion in such titles. But how difficult is to attach hardware accelerated physics effects to a game?

Today, with the help of David Schoemehl, Manager of GPU PhysX Content in NVIDIA, and Johnny Costello, Technical Artist, we will try to give you a brief “behind the scenes” view on the process of enhancing games with extra PhysX content.

PhysXInfo.com: Hi, Johnny and David. Can you please introduce yourself?

Johnny Costello: My name is Johnny Costello, I’m 29 years old and am a native to the Midwestern United States. I went to college at Savannah College of Art and Design and received my B.F.A. in game development. I have been a technical artist at NVIDIA for about two and a half years. During that time I have worked on several GPU PhysX titles such as Batman: Arkham Asylum, Batman: Arkham City, Mafia II, Dark Void, and Alice: Madness Returns.

David Schoemehl: My name is David Schoemehl, I joined AGEIA in 2006 as an applications engineer and was the project manager on Warmonger. Since the purchase of AGEIA by NVIDIA in 2008 I have led or supported several shipping GPU PhysX titles and demos including Batman: Arkham Asylum, The Samaritan Demo, Sacred 2, The Great Kulu Demo, and Alice: Madness Returns.

My current title is Manager of GPU PhysX Content and I am responsible for aligning NVIDIA’s engineers and artists to support developers on GPU PhysX engagements. I also work closely with Epic Games to ensure a solid integration of GPU PhysX/APEX features in UE3.

PhysXInfo.com: Johnny, what is your task as a PhysX technical artist?

Johnny Costello: My tasks can change a lot from day to day, but usually I’m working on a game title in some capacity. Our goal at NVIDIA is to provide the tools that developers need in order to add great GPU features to their games. So I spend much of my time working with developers to help guide them as they use our technology to create exciting content.

Depending on the structure of a particular engagement I may also work alongside the developer to create GPU PhysX content. Then there are other days where I help design and review our tools and production workflows.

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Written by Zogrim

February 10th, 2012 at 12:02 pm

PhysX Fluids in Alice: Madness Returns

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NVIDIA has published a technical article, related to Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) fluid simulation method, used in as part of GPU PhysX effects in recently released Alice: Madness Return title.

As we said before, overall level of PhysX particle effects is impressive, but fluid dynamics itself can only be called – decent. We already saw more detailed SPH-fluids in Cryostasis (up to 30 000 particles), gameplay affecting fluids in Crazy Machines 2 and even SPH based smoke in Batman: Arkham Asylum and Mafia II.

What we are really expecting from upcoming PhysX games, are next-gen fluid solvers like those showcased in this PhysX research video or in Raging Rapids Ride demo, for example.

However, if you are interested in SPH-fluid simulation technique and particles rendering, we recommend you to familiarize with following materials (in addition to the article this post is related to – which is an interesting read anyway):

Written by Zogrim

June 25th, 2011 at 1:27 am

Alice: Madness Returns PhysX benchmarks roundup

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Alice: Madness Returns – first game with GPU PhysX support this year and title with most impressive PhysX particle effects.

To determine hardware PhysX performance patterns and GPU requirements we tried to gather all PhysX focused articles and benchmarks, available so far.

[18.06.2011] Alice: Madness Returns GPU test by GameGpu.ru

One of the first articles with proper GPU PhysX benchmarks.

According to their test, only top level NVIDIA GPUs can ensure decent framerate, while used for both graphics and PhysX calculations (however, from our experience, only most intensive PhysX scenes are affecting performance so negative).

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Written by Zogrim

June 24th, 2011 at 1:30 pm

GPU PhysX in Alice: Madness Returns

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Alice: Madness Returns, highly anticipated sequel to original American McGee’s Alice, and first game with GPU PhysX support for this year. As always, we have prepared comparison PhysX video – for your viewing pleasure.

Update: PhysX benchmarks roundup

Update #2: Comparison PhysX screenshots available

GPU PhysX content in Alice: Madness Return can be characterized as “Particle Madness“. In a good way – this game contains probably most rich and diverse physically simulated particle effects, of all games with hardware PhysX support. From habitual and universal debris, chunks, smoke and dust (emitted either by player’s weapons or enemies) to environmental particles (dynamic leaves, ash, bubles, etc) and place-specific effects.

Physical simulation of goopy oil-like substance, that is spawned when black “Ruin” beings are damaged or killed, requires a special notice. During intence fights, up to 10 000 SPH fluid particles, which are colliding with level geometry and reacting to player’s movement, can be processed simultaneously.

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Written by Zogrim

June 17th, 2011 at 5:47 am

Posted in PhysX Games

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Alice: Madness Returns will feature GPU PhysX effects

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In a recent promo video for upcoming GTX 560 GPU, NVIDIA has spoiled next game with support of GPU accelerated PhysX effects – Alice: Madness Returns, sequel to American McGee’s visionary classic “Alice” title.

UPDATE: Comparison GPU PhysX video

Starting at 1:34, comparison PhysX sequences are showcased. According to the video, GPU PhysX content in Alice will include (following list may be not full) destructible environments..

..volumetric fluid effects (for example, oil-like fluid from damaged enemies)..

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Written by Zogrim

May 13th, 2011 at 8:05 am

Posted in PhysX Games

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