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PhysX SDK 3.3 source code is now available for free

PhysX SDK 3.3 source code is now available for free

Free source code access for Windows, Linux, OS X and Android.

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Introducing NVIDIA HairWorks: fur and hair simulation solution

Introducing NVIDIA HairWorks: fur and hair simulation solution

Real-time simulation and rendering of realistic hair and fur

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Introducing NVIDIA FLEX: unified GPU PhysX solver

Introducing NVIDIA FLEX: unified GPU PhysX solver

Universal particle-based physics solver

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The Evolution of PhysX SDK, performance-wise

The Evolution of PhysX SDK, performance-wise

PhysX 2.8 vs PhysX 3.x vs Bullet

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Metro: Last Light PhysX Benchmarks roundup

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PC version of recently released Metro: Last Light title features not only vivid DX11 based graphics, but also hardware accelerated PhysX effects.

In the following article we’ll try to gather the most reliable and accurate GPU PhysX benchmarks and tests for this game.

[14.05.2013] Metro Last Light – GPU Test by GameGPU

Sufficient amount of NVIDIA GPUs was tested in this article with the help of Metro’s built-in benchmark. However, since heavy graphics options (like SSAA) were used, it is hard to determine actual PhysX performance.

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Written by Zogrim

June 5th, 2013 at 5:07 pm

GPU PhysX in Metro: Last Light

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Metro: Last Light, a post-apocalyptic first person shooter with survival horror elements, is joining the family of PhysX enabled titles by offering a support for GPU accelerated physics effects.

Update: Metro Last Light PhysX Benchmarks roundup

Update #2: Metro: Last Light – GPU PhysX Profile

First game in the series – Metro 2033 – was also featuring a GPU PhysX content, however, it was limited to basic particle effects.

Was the Last Light able to improve the results of its predecessor? Let’s find out.

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Written by Zogrim

May 24th, 2013 at 10:54 am

PhysX Research: Stable Stacking

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An interesting “proof-of concept” demo was revealed today by Pierre Terdiman, senior software engineer in NVIDIA.

It is showcasing new CPU based algorithm, that will allow more effecient and stable simulation of large stacks.

Currently, PhysX SDK can utilize a feature (more like a “crude hack”) called “Adaptive Force” in order to improve stability of the stacks, but it also introduces some side-effects in certain cases.

As you can see on the picture above, 50-box-wide stack, simulated with the new algorithm, remains fully stable, while similar stacks, handled by any other current physics engine (PhysX SDKs/Bullet) collapse shortly.

Demo is also available for public download.

We hope that this new stacking solution will be included in PhysX SDK in the near future.

Written by Zogrim

May 23rd, 2013 at 2:40 pm

Posted in PhysX Research

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PhysX SDK and APEX now on Xbox One

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NVIDIA has announced that both PhysX SDK physics engine and APEX dynamics framework will offer support for next-generation Xbox One console from Microsoft.

“We are excited to extend our PhysX and APEX technologies to Microsoft’s Xbox One console”, said Mike Skolones, product manager for the PhysX SDK at NVIDIA.

“We look forward to the Xbox developer community taking advantage of PhysX and APEX along with Xbox One’s processing power, programmability and next-generation features to design cutting-edge games that deliver an unparalleled and ultra-realistic experience”

Earlier this year, it was also stated that PhysX SDK/APEX SDK will be available for Sony’s Playstation 4 console.

We assume that similar to PS4 case, PhysX for Xbox One will only use console’s CPU for physics calculations, at least at the beginning.

Written by Zogrim

May 21st, 2013 at 9:37 pm

PhysX System Software 9.13.0325

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ASUS 311.54 GPU Drivers have brought us a new release of PhysX System Software - PSS 9.13.0325

Official Release Notes are unknown.

Update: we have received an information that 9.13.0325 PSS is a release candidate for future GPU drivers, does not contain any enhancements for the DLLs and is not recommended to use currently.

You can download PSS 9.13.0325 from our server (25 mb)

Thanks to Stefan for the link.

Written by Zogrim

May 20th, 2013 at 11:02 pm

Posted in PhysX Drivers

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Metro Last Light: GPU PhysX effects explored

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More or less detailed information on GPU PhysX support level in the upcoming Metro: Last Light title was revealed today in the “Metro: Last Light Graphics Breakdown & Performance Guide” article by NVIDIA.

Update: GPU PhysX in Metro: Last Light

Similar to the previous Metro 2033 game, Last Light features two levels of PhysX integration – standart, CPU based physics calculations like rigid body physics and ragdolls, working on all platforms from PC to consoles, and extra, so called “Advanced PhysX” effects, designed to be accelerated on the GPU.

According to the article, advanced physics effects will include:

  • Physically simulated particles such as impact debris, sparks, extra chunks from destructible objects and other types of environmental particles.
  • SPH based smoke and fog simulation, that reacts to players movements and actions. With the advanced physics disabled, players will see only pre-backed non-interactive animation instead of real-time simulation.
  • Interactive cloth objects, such as banners, flags and drapes. Yet again, without advanced PhysX option enabled, most cloth will remain pre-animated or static.
  • Dynamic forcefields, such as shockwaves from grenade explosions, that will affect all types of the PhysX effects decribed above, for example, repell all nearby particles and rigid bodies upon detonation.

Looks solid and it seems that PhysX effects in Last Light will end up being more vibrant and diverse than in previous Metro title.

As always, you can expect full PhysX review here on PhysXInfo.com short after Metro: Last Light release, which will happen this week.

Written by Zogrim

May 13th, 2013 at 9:59 pm

Multithreaded performance scaling in PhysX SDK

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Recent “The Evolution of PhysX” article has unvealed the current situation with performance improvements among various PhysX SDK vesions, however, one interesting case has remained outside the coverage – performance scaling in multithreaded environments.

It is known that, while PhysX SDK 2.8 has rather limited multi-threading capabilities (mostly working on per-scene or per-compartment basis), PhysX SDK 3.x can distribute various tasks across worker threads much more effective, and thus offer better support for multi-core CPUs.

But how well does multi-threading actually work in PhysX 3 (we’ll take the latest 3.3 version)? Using the same PEEL (Physics Engine Evaluation Lab) tool to the record the performance metrics, we will try to shed the light on this question.

Scene #1 – random dynamic primitives in a box

Static container filled with 256 random primitives (sphere, box, capsule).

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Written by Zogrim

May 12th, 2013 at 11:08 pm

The Evolution of PhysX SDK, performance-wise

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A quite interesting, unexpected and a little emotional article – The Evolution of PhysX – was published today by Pierre Terdiman, senior software engineer in NVIDIA and one of the developers of the original NovodeX engine.

Update: Multithreaded performance scaling in PhysX SDK

The article provides in-depth performance comparison between various versions of PhysX SDK (2.8.4, 3.2 and 3.3 Beta), using well-known open-source Bullet physics engine as as a reference point.

The performance tests were performed using PEELPhysics Engine Evaluation Lab, a specialized tool that is using within NVIDIA to research behaviour and performance of various physics engines using a set of standartized scenes.

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Written by Zogrim

May 12th, 2013 at 12:37 pm

PhysX SDK 3.3 Closed Beta Testing begins

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PhysX SDK 3.x, topped by latest ’stable’ SDK 3.2.4 release, represents in many ways better and now, after three releases, relatively mature alternative to a prooven PhysX SDK 2.8.x branch.

Update: PhysX SDK 3.3 Beta is available for public

Recently, the PhysX SDK team began to offer a preview of the upcoming version, PhysX SDK 3.3, to advanced PhysX users — professional developers, who have the time and experience to try out the latest offering, test it and provide feedback to the PhysX SDK team.

If that describes you or your team, do not hesitate to contact PhysXlicensing@nvidia.com and use the words ‘beta-3.3 request’ in the subject line to apply for the SDK 3.3 Closed Beta Testing.

PhysX SDK 3.3 – Feature Highlights

Performance and stability optimizations for rigid body solver

Rigid body collision performance was improved up to 15-20% in comparison to SDK 3.2, while memory footprint was reduced.

Please note that we expect more performance improvements in final release

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Written by Zogrim

May 3rd, 2013 at 12:28 am

Posted in PhysX SDK

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Minor PhysX SDK 3.2.4 release is available

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NVIDIA has revealed new bug-fixing release of the PhysX SDK 3.xPhysX SDK 3.2.4

Update: PhysX SDK 3.3 Closed Beta Testing begins

Update: PhysX SDK 3.2.5 available

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PhysX SDK 3.2.4 – Release Notes

  • General
    • Fixed a bug which caused actors to return wrong world bounds if the bounds minimum was above 10000 on any axis.
    • Reporting allocation names can now be enabled or disabled (see PxFoundation::setReportAllocationNames). When enabled, some platforms allocate memory through ‘malloc’.
    • eEXCEPTION_ON_STARTUP is removed from PxErrorCode and it is no longer needed.
    • Added boilerplate.txt to the Tools folder. SpuShaderDump.exe and clang.exe require it.
    • PxWindowsDelayLoadHook.h has been moved from Include/foundation/windows to Include/common/windows.
    • PxScene::saveToDesc now reports the bounceThresholdVelocity value.
    • Fixed a bug in PxDefaultSimulationFilterShader: the value of the second filter constant in the collision filtering equation was ignored and instead the value of the first filter constant was used.
    • Fixed a crash bug in PCM collision.
  • Rigid Bodies
    • Forces applied to bodies (with PxRigidBody::addForce) that go to sleep in the subsequent update now have their applied forces cleared when the body is set to sleep to avoid them being applied in a later update when the body is once more awake. This bug broke the rule that forces applied with PxRigidBody::addForce do not persist beyond the next scene update.

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Written by Zogrim

April 26th, 2013 at 12:22 pm

Posted in PhysX SDK

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