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Archive for September 29th, 2009

PhysX 3DS Max 2.0 Plug-in features preview

with 5 comments

Thanks to Gavin Kistner, Nvidia PhysX plug-ins manager and designer, we can now take a print of what features and improvements 2.0 PhysX plug-ins (currently in development) will have over current generation DCC tools

Following overview is related to PhysX Plug-in for 3DS Max, but we think Maya plug-in feature set won’t differ much.

There’s a proper PhysX toolbar providing access to commands and simulation control, and a proper panel for setting global parameters.

The new plug-in has been heavily overhauled to better support Max workflow. Rigid Bodies are created as modifiers (constraints are still separate helpers). You can change attributes of the modifier, or the underlying geometry, and changes are automatically reflected in the simulation.  There are sub-object modes in the modifier for visualizing and controlling the Initial Velocity and Spin directions. We have a much better presentation of all attributes.

The physical mesh shapes (Sphere, Box, Capsule, Convex Hull) wrap around the geometry nicely by default. You can regenerate a convex hull with specified inner (deflation) or outer (inflation) offset. You can convert a convex hull to an Editable Mesh, tweak vertices, and get those changes reflected on the shape.

If all works as planned, it should be pretty clear and easy how to use multiple physical meshes for a single object.

The D6 joints have been heavily worked on to be more useful. The visualizations are improved. For a minor convenience, there are toolbar buttons to create a joint with common presets (e.g. Hinge, Ball & Socket, Sliding, etc.). The presentation of the attributes has been greatly simplified and clarified in the new rollouts.

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Written by Zogrim

September 29th, 2009 at 2:54 am

Posted in PhysX Tools

Tagged with , ,

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