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Introduction to Position Based Fluids

with 15 comments

Many of you may have already seen an impressive real-time destruction and fluid simulation demo from GDC 2013.

Update: Position Based Fluids explained

Update #2: Introducing NVIDIA FLEX: unified GPU PhysX solver

We won’t talk about fracturing technology today, instead, let’s focus on the new fluid simulation algorithm, presented in the demo – it is known as Position Based Fluids.

Position Based Fluids is a way of simulating liquids using Position Based Dynamics (PBD), the same framework that is utilized for cloth and deformables simulation in PhysX SDK.

Because PBD uses an iterative solver, it can maintain incompressibility more efficiently than traditional SPH fluid solvers. It also has an artificial pressure term which improves particle distribution and creates nice surface tension-like effects (note the filaments in the splashes). Finally, vorticity confinement is used to allow the user to inject energy back to the fluid.

More details on this a new technique will be available later on, in a SIGGRAPH 2013 paper “Position-Based Fluids” by Miles Macklin and Matthias Mueller-Fischer, and we also expect it to be included in future versions of PhysX SDK or APEX modules.

Written by Zogrim

April 22nd, 2013 at 11:17 am

15 Responses to 'Introduction to Position Based Fluids'

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  1. Amazing work, can’t wait to see this in use. What is the logic around the sea foam effect?

      

    bnortman

    23 Apr 13 at 8:08 pm

  2. Hope this will be part of PhysX DCC or some external tool like PhysXLab and import/export to max/other

      

    Tommy

    23 Apr 13 at 8:31 pm

  3. I’m amazed by the performance. Also the foam looks amazing, seems like it’s simulated together with particles.
    Wondering when the paper will be achievable.

      

    Xing

    24 Apr 13 at 12:02 am

  4. This looks great, but the individual particles are noticeable on the bigger simulations, especially the aquarium. Hopefully we’ll get to see a higher powered demonstration, with much smaller particles

      

    Nathan

    24 Apr 13 at 3:27 am

  5. I would be interested in speaking with you some more on this subject, do you have a contact address?

      

    chris

    24 Apr 13 at 4:24 am

  6. That looks absolutely amazing!! when can we get it to work with the SDK? man im so excited! is there any code released regarding this?

      

    GameIndica

    24 Apr 13 at 7:26 am

  7. Existe coisa melhor no mercado há tempos…
    Ex.: Realflow
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COS5XIH_R08

      

    Diego Ruiz

    24 Apr 13 at 4:28 pm

  8. Diego Ruiz: Ex.: Realflow

    Yeah, let’s compare real-time simulaton with offline sim, which can take minutes and even hours to render a single frame.

      

    Zogrim

    24 Apr 13 at 4:44 pm

  9. Diego Ruiz:
    Existe coisa melhor no mercado há tempos…
    Ex.: Realflow
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COS5XIH_R08

    Esse demo é em real-time, seu animal. RealFlow leva horas pra renderizar.

      

    João da Silva

    24 Apr 13 at 10:19 pm

  10. Zogrim: Yeah, let’s compare real-time simulaton with offline sim, which can take minutes and even hours to render a single frame.

    I’m on your side but a side note for you stick to calling it pre-render not offline… this real time rendering doesn’t connect to the internet at least it didn’t say it did… it’s using a gtx card so we wouldn’t call it an online render

      

    uh..

    25 Apr 13 at 8:31 pm

  11. uh..: but a side note for you stick to calling it pre-render not offline

    Hm, even if my memory is deceiving me, we can always ask wikipedia – “pre-rendering (also called offline rendering)”.

    Anyway, apart from terminology issues, Realflow (or Naiad, for example) can not be really compared with this demo.

      

    Zogrim

    25 Apr 13 at 9:04 pm

  12. Is it correct in the limit?

      

    Lars

    26 Apr 13 at 2:43 am

  13. By what I have read, this method is not based on Navier-Stokes equations. So, can we call this method physically based or is it just a very very very good faker?

      

    sejton

    26 Apr 13 at 9:57 am

  14. Can i get the source code?

      

    khal

    1 May 13 at 3:21 pm

  15. khal:

    Can i get the source code?

    I don’t think this is possible, but you should ask authors anyway (links in the article above)

      

    Zogrim

    1 May 13 at 9:48 pm


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