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Author Topic: What's with the FX labels?  (Read 3403 times)
joeyshorty2
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« on: October 29, 2014, 05:00:55 am »

Hey I just noticed the "FX" label on the front page. I was curious to what exactly that means.
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Zogrim
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2014, 12:42:32 pm »

FX labels were added to designate NVIDIA's non-PhysX SDK based, GPU accelerated physics related tech, such as HairWorks, FlameWorks, TurfEffects and WaveWorks (they brand them as VisualFX modules).

Since there will be games featuring VisualFX effects only (such as FarCry 4 with HairWorks) and some FX stuff can even run on AMD GPUs, separate label was required to distinguish them from classic GPU PhysX titles.
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joeyshorty2
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2014, 11:05:20 pm »

Ah ok. So what would games like the new NASCAR and Just Cause 2 really fall under since they use GPU acceleration to do some particle effects and water physics?

Also you think that NVIDIA the new visual FX by gameworks will start phasing out physx as we know it?
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Zogrim
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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2014, 12:02:26 am »

So what would games like the new NASCAR and Just Cause 2 really fall under since they use GPU acceleration to do some particle effects and water physics?
Custom CUDA-based solutions are very rare, so no labels for them yet.

Also you think that NVIDIA the new visual FX by gameworks will start phasing out physx as we know it?
PhysX SDK is a popular middleware product, which NV sells for money, so it can't be "phased out".

However, as standart GPU PhysX effects like particles and cloth are becoming common is games for new consoles (look at Lords of the Fallen), NV will invent more and more advanced tech to burden your GPU with (FLEX, smoke and flame sim, etc).
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joeyshorty2
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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2014, 06:09:20 am »

Sorry meant to say accelerated physx. I know the middleware itself is super popular and I can't see that going away. It seems a lot of things such as unreal 4 just has gpu accelerated particle effects but it doesn't work exactly the same as accelerated physx.
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Zogrim
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« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2014, 10:59:23 am »

Sorry meant to say accelerated physx. It seems a lot of things such as unreal 4 just has gpu accelerated particle effects but it doesn't work exactly the same as accelerated physx.
All the fancy depth buffer GPU particles seems to have bunch of limitations, that's why LotF devs ended using APEX on CPU for almost all the particle stuff, instead of their own GPU particles.

As for GPU PhysX, it will change over time (with more emphasis put on complex stuff like FLEX, as I said), but will remain as a feature for sure.
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Hameedo
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2016, 06:55:13 pm »

Ah ok. So what would games like the new NASCAR and Just Cause 2 really fall under since they use GPU acceleration to do some particle effects and water physics?
Also Rage and Wolfenstein Old Blood uses CUDA to accelerate Textures compression/decompression.
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