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Author Topic: Physics papers and demos from SIGGRAPH 2013 #1  (Read 7350 times)
Zogrim
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« on: May 04, 2013, 09:52:59 pm »

The ACM SIGGRAPH Publications program contains ones of the the most comprehensive publications in Computer Graphics and Physics Simulation.

Let's do a recap of most interesting papers, revealed on the eve of SIGGRAPH 2013 conference.

Highly Adaptive Liquid Simulations on Tetrahedral Meshes
Ryoichi Ando (Kyushu University), Nils Thurey (ScanlineVFX), Chris Wojtan (IST Austria)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rce92SZ1y60" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rce92SZ1y60</a>


Abstract:
Quote
We introduce a new method for efficiently simulating liquid with extreme amounts of spatial adaptivity. Our method combines several key components to drastically speed up the simulation of large-scale fluid phenomena: We leverage an alternative Eulerian tetrahedral mesh discretization to significantly reduce the complexity of the pressure solve while increasing the robustness with respect to element quality and removing the possibility of locking.

Next, we enable subtle free-surface phenomena by deriving novel second-order boundary conditions consistent with our discretization. We couple this discretization with a spatially adaptive Fluid-Implicit Particle (FLIP) method, enabling efficient, robust, minimally-dissipative simulations that can undergo sharp changes in spatial resolution while minimizing artifacts. Along the way, we provide a new method for generating a smooth and detailed surface from a set of particles with variable sizes.

Finally, we explore several new sizing functions for determining spatially adaptive simulation resolutions, and we show how to couple them to our simulator. We combine each of these elements to produce a simulation algorithm that is capable of creating animations at high maximum resolutions while avoiding common pitfalls like inaccurate boundary conditions and inefficient computation.

Project page | Paper


Modeling Friction and Air Effects between Cloth and Deformable Bodies
Zhili Chen (The Ohio State University), Renguo Feng (The Ohio State University), Huamin Wang (The Ohio State University)


Abstract:
Quote
Real-world cloth exhibits complex behaviors when it contacts deformable bodies. In this paper, we study how to improve the simulation of cloth-body interactions from three perspectives: collision,friction, and air pressure.

We propose an effcient and robust algorithm to detect the collisions between cloth and deformable bodies, using the surface traversal technique. We develop a friction measurement device and we use it to capture frictional data from real-world experiments. The derived friction model can realistically handle complex friction properties of cloth, including anisotropy and nonlinearity.

To produce pressure effects caused by the air between cloth and deformable bodies, we define an air mass field on the cloth layer and we use real-world air permeability data to animate it over time. Our results demonstrate the effciency and accuracy of our system in simulating objects with a three-layer structure (i.e., a cloth layer, an air layer, and an inner body layer), such as pillows, comforters, down jackets, and stuffed toys.

Project page | Paper | Video


Liquid Surface Tracking with Error Compensation
Morten Bojsen-Hansen (IST Austria), Chris Wojtan (IST Austria)

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0U36AM1M08" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0U36AM1M08</a>


Abstract:
Quote
Our work concerns the combination of an Eulerian liquid simulation with a high-resolution surface tracker (e.g. the level set method or a Lagrangian triangle mesh). The naive application of a high-resolution surface tracker to a low-resolution velocity field can produce many visually disturbing physical and topological artifacts that limit their use in practice.

We address these problems by defining an error function which compares the current state of the surface tracker to the set of physically valid surface states. By reducing this error with a gradient descent technique, we introduce a novel physics-based surface fairing method. Similarly, by treating this error function as a potential energy, we derive a new surface correction force that mimics the vortex sheet equations. We demonstrate our results with both level set and mesh-based surface trackers.

Project page | Paper


Reference: Physics Based Animation
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